Hug A Tree & Survive

Hug-a-Tree and Survive is an AdventureSmart program that helps lost children survive in the woods. It

teaches children how not to become lost in the woods, and what to do should they become lost.

Hug-A-Tree and Survive is a great program to bring into your family, classroom, guide or scout unit, youth group, or any other community group interested in teaching kids about being safe. If a child should become lost in the woods, hugging a tree can help them stay safe, and be found. Staying near a tree offers some protection from the elements, and keeps lost children in the same place, which makes it easier for searchers to find them.

The Hug-A-Tree Rules

Hug-A-Tree and Survive emphasizes four key rules to keeping children safe:

1.

Tell an adult where you are going.

a.

Always tell your parents, or another trusted adult where you are going, who you are going with, and when you will be

back. You can do this in person, over the phone, through a text message, or by leaving a note in a place they will see

it.

2.

If you are lost, “Hug-A-Tree” and stay put.

a.

A tree can help protect you from the elements while you’re outdoors, and most importantly, keep you in one place.

Depending on where you are, there may not always be a tree. Perhaps

your “tree” can be a large rock or bench at a park, or a sales counter at a

mall. No matter what your landmark is, it is important to stay put, in

order to stay safe.

3.

Keep warm and dry.

a.

Temperatures change throughout the day, and can drop at night. Even if

you are warm during the day, keep your jacket handy for night time. If

you get cold, put on an extra layer, pull up your hood or put on your hat

if you have one, tuck your shirt in, tuck pant legs into your socks, and

zip up your jacket. You can also keep warm by building a nest to keep

you off the ground, or by using an emergency shelter.

Help searchers find you by answering their calls.

Whether searchers are parents, police officers, or SAR volunteers, remember they just want to get you home safely. Answer back

to their calls by making noise and signaling, so you can be heard and seen. Make sure to leave lots of footprints and clues, so

searchers can follow your tracks to find you.

While designed for the outdoors, these rules are easily transferable to other places including sporting events, shopping malls,

public parks, urban areas, and much more! Together, these core points work to ensure kids have the knowledge and training

needed to safely enjoy the outdoors, and their communities.

The Hug-a-Tree and Survive Presentation

The Hug-a-Tree and Survive presentation is aimed at children aged 5–11, and can be delivered by any interested

adult—including parents, teachers, and guide or scout leaders—using the Presenting Hug-A-Tree guide. Alternatively, when

available, trained AdventureSmart presenters are able to present the program to groups. Visit our Request a Presentation page

to submit your request.

Hug-A-Tree and Survive was developed in the United States following the search for Jimmy Beveridge in 1981, and was first

adapted for Canadian use by the RCMP. It was updated by the National Search and Rescue Secretariat (NSS) and the SAR

Volunteer Association of Canada (SARVAC) in 2015 with new videos and activities to support program delivery.

Important to note: AdventureSmart is a prevention program that

makes key safety information available to the public and to trained

presenters. Organizations that request presentations or choose to

deliver this information themselves are responsible for the safety

of their audiences, and AdventureSmart accepts no liability. Policies

and screening procedures that ensure children are protected

should always be followed, including ensuring a responsible

person from your organization stays with the group throughout the

presentation.

The Hug-a-Tree and Survive Video

This 12 minute video features John who is so excited to explore

that he loses his way. Once he realizes he is lost, John is well-

prepared, and uses his head to stay safe and be found! This age-

appropriate video is a great way to show kids how not to become

lost, and what to do if you are.

Hug- A-Tree Program

If a child should become lost in the

woods, hugging a tree can help them

stay safe, and be found. Staying near

a tree offers some protection from

the elements, and keeps lost children

in the same place, which makes it

easier for searchers to find them.

FOLLOW US

  

CONTACT US

Annapolis County Ground Search and Rescue,  P.O. Box 234, Bridgetown N.S. B0S 1C0 902 349 7778 info@acgsar.ca

Hug A Tree & Survive

Hug-a-Tree and Survive is an AdventureSmart program that helps lost children survive in

the woods. It teaches children how not to become lost in the woods, and what to do

should they become lost.

Hug-A-Tree and Survive is a great program to bring into your family, classroom, guide or scout unit, youth group, or any other community group interested in teaching kids about being safe. If a child should become lost in the woods, hugging a tree can help them stay safe, and be found. Staying near a tree offers some protection from the elements, and keeps lost children in the same place, which makes it easier for searchers to find them.

The Hug-A-Tree Rules

Hug-A-Tree and Survive emphasizes four key rules to keeping children safe:

1.

Tell an adult where you are going.

a.

Always tell your parents, or another trusted adult where you are going, who you are going with,

and when you will be back. You can do this in person, over the phone, through a text message, or

by leaving a note in a place they will see it.

2.

If you are lost, “Hug-A-Tree” and stay put.

a.

A tree can help protect you from the elements while you’re outdoors, and most importantly, keep

you in one place. Depending on where you are, there may not always be a tree. Perhaps your “tree”

can be a large rock or bench at a park, or a sales counter at a mall. No matter what your landmark

is, it is important to stay put, in order to stay safe.

3.

Keep warm and dry.

a.

Temperatures change throughout the day, and can drop at night. Even if you are warm during the

day, keep your jacket handy for night time. If you get cold, put on an extra layer, pull up your hood

or put on your hat if you have one, tuck your shirt in, tuck pant legs into your socks, and zip up

your jacket. You can also keep warm by building a

nest to keep you off the ground, or by using an

emergency shelter.

Help searchers find you by answering their calls.

Whether searchers are parents, police officers, or SAR

volunteers, remember they just want to get you home safely.

Answer back to their calls by making noise and signaling, so

you can be heard and seen. Make sure to leave lots of

footprints and clues, so searchers can follow your tracks to

find you.

While designed for the outdoors, these rules are easily transferable to other places including sporting events,

shopping malls, public parks, urban areas, and much more! Together, these core points work to ensure kids

have the knowledge and training needed to safely enjoy the outdoors, and their communities.

The Hug-a-Tree and Survive Presentation

The Hug-a-Tree and Survive presentation is aimed at children aged 5–11, and can be delivered by any

interested adult—including parents, teachers, and guide or scout leaders—using the Presenting Hug-A-Tree

guide. Alternatively, when available, trained AdventureSmart presenters are able to present the program to

groups. Visit our Request a Presentation page to submit your request.

Hug-A-Tree and Survive was developed in the United States following the search for Jimmy Beveridge in

1981, and was first adapted for Canadian use by the RCMP. It was updated by the National Search and

Rescue Secretariat (NSS) and the SAR Volunteer Association of Canada (SARVAC) in 2015 with new videos and

activities to support program delivery.

Important to note: AdventureSmart is a prevention program that makes key safety information available to

the public and to trained presenters. Organizations that request presentations or choose to deliver this

information themselves are responsible for the safety of their audiences, and AdventureSmart accepts no

liability. Policies and screening procedures that ensure children are protected should always be followed,

including ensuring a responsible person from your organization stays with the group throughout the

presentation.

The Hug-a-Tree and Survive Video

This 12 minute video features John who is so

excited to explore that he loses his way. Once he

realizes he is lost, John is well-prepared, and uses

his head to stay safe and be found! This age-

appropriate video is a great way to show kids how

not to become lost, and what to do if you are.

Hug- A-Tree

Program

If a child should become lost

in the woods, hugging a tree

can help them stay safe, and

be found. Staying near a tree

offers some protection from

the elements, and keeps lost

children in the same place,

which makes it easier for

searchers to find them.

CONTACT US

Annapolis County Ground Search and Rescue,  P.O. Box 234, Bridgetown N.S. B0S 1C0 902 349 7778 info@ACGSAR.ca

Annapolis County Ground Search and Rescue Service Area

   FOLLOW US

  

Hug A Tree & Survive

Hug-a-Tree and Survive is an

AdventureSmart program that helps

lost children survive in the woods. It

teaches children how not to become

lost in the woods, and what to do

should they become lost.

Hug-A-Tree and Survive is a great program to bring into your family, classroom, guide or scout unit, youth group, or any other community group interested in teaching kids about being safe. If a child should become lost in the woods, hugging a tree can help them stay safe, and be found. Staying near a tree offers some protection from the elements, and keeps lost children in the same place, which makes it easier for searchers to find them.

The Hug-A-Tree Rules

Hug-A-Tree and Survive emphasizes four key rules to

keeping children safe:

1.

Tell an adult where you are

going.

a.

Always tell your parents, or another trusted

adult where you are going, who you are going

with, and when you will be back. You can do

this in person, over the phone, through a text

message, or by leaving a note in a place they

will see it.

2.

If you are lost, “Hug-A-Tree”

and stay put.

a.

A tree can help protect you from the elements

while you’re outdoors, and most importantly,

keep you in one place. Depending on where

you are, there may not always be a tree.

Perhaps your “tree” can be a large rock or

bench at a park, or a sales counter at a mall.

No matter what your landmark is, it is

important to stay put, in order to stay safe.

3.

Keep warm and dry.

a.

Temperatures change throughout the day,

and can drop at night. Even if you are warm

during the day, keep your jacket handy for

night time. If you get cold, put on an extra

layer, pull up your hood or put on your hat if

you have one, tuck your shirt in, tuck pant

legs into your socks, and zip up your jacket.

You can also keep warm by building a nest to

keep you off the ground, or by using an

emergency shelter.

Help searchers find you by answering

their calls.

Whether searchers are parents, police officers, or SAR

volunteers, remember they just want to get you home

safely. Answer back to their calls by making noise and

signaling, so you can be heard and seen. Make sure to

leave lots of footprints and clues, so searchers can

follow your tracks to find you.

While designed for the outdoors, these rules are easily

transferable to other places including sporting events,

shopping malls, public parks, urban areas, and much

more! Together, these core points work to ensure kids

have the knowledge and training needed to safely enjoy

the outdoors, and their communities.

The Hug-a-Tree and Survive

Presentation

The Hug-a-Tree and Survive presentation is aimed at

children aged 5–11, and can be delivered by any

interested adult—including parents, teachers, and

guide or scout leaders—using the Presenting Hug-A-

Tree guide. Alternatively, when available, trained

AdventureSmart presenters are able to present the

program to groups. Visit our Request a Presentation

page to submit your request.

Hug-A-Tree and Survive was developed in the United

States following the search for Jimmy Beveridge in

1981, and was first adapted for Canadian use by the

RCMP. It was updated by the National Search and

Rescue Secretariat (NSS) and the SAR Volunteer

Association of Canada (SARVAC) in 2015 with new

videos and activities to support program delivery.

Important to note: AdventureSmart is a prevention

program that makes key safety information available to

the public and to trained presenters. Organizations that

request presentations or choose to deliver this

information themselves are responsible for the safety

of their audiences, and AdventureSmart accepts no

liability. Policies and screening procedures that ensure

children are protected should always be followed,

including ensuring a responsible person from your

organization stays with the group throughout the

presentation.

The Hug-a-Tree and Survive Video

This 12 minute video features John who is so excited to

explore that he loses his way. Once he realizes he is

lost, John is well-prepared, and uses his head to stay

safe and be found! This age-appropriate video is a

great way to show kids how not to become lost, and

what to do if you are.

If you're ever lost, hug a tree

Annapolis County Ground

Search and Rescue Service Area

CONTACT US

Annapolis County Ground Search and Rescue,  P.O. Box 234, Bridgetown N.S. B0S 1C0 902 349 7778 info@ACGSAR.ca

   FOLLOW US

  
A N N A P O L I S C O U N T Y S E A R C H & R E S C U E
A N N A P O L I S C O U N T Y S E A R C H & R E S C U E